1978 Convention- Minutes, Event Programs, Committee Rules, Correspondences (Fenkell Papers, Box 1, Folder 21)

Title

1978 Convention- Minutes, Event Programs, Committee Rules, Correspondences (Fenkell Papers, Box 1, Folder 21)

Description

Promotional, planning , and fundraising material for the 1978 Far West Convention. Includes Filipino Sacramentan fundraising efforts with "Vision of a War Bride" presentation.

Creator

Far West Convention

Date

1978

Rights

NON-COMMERCIAL USE PERMITTED
For other purposes, please contact Bulosan Center archivist Jason Sarmiento at ajsarmiento@ucdavis.edu.

Format

JPG, PDF

Identifier

ucdw_wa012_s002_0001-0099; ucdw_wa012_s002_f021

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Document Text

(OCR Text with errors; See PDF for complete text)

1978 Filipino People's
Far West Convention
U.C.L.A.
September 1, 2, 3
Presented By
1978 FPFWC PLANNING GROUP
Sponsors:
Asian American Studies Center ( UCLA)
Samahar,g Pilipino {UCLA)
Union of Democratic Filipinos ( KDP)

Unite and Fight for Our Rights
WHAT IS THE FILIPINO PEOPLE'S FAR
WEST CONVENTION?
The Filipino Peoples Far West Convention
(FPFWC) first began in 1971 marking Filipinos'
awak~ning to the realities faced by our community
here in the U.S. as part of the Civil Rights Movement.
Since then, the FPFWC has yearly brought together
Filipinos from all over the West Coast to discuss
pressing issues faced by our people as well as share
with each other common experiences as a minority
community in this country.
Going on its 8th year, the FPFWC has matured
into an organized and disciplined gathering of Filipinos
which has become commonly recognized with
the following main features. One is the general assembly
which has traditionally opened the convention
with speakers addressing the delegates on the tasks
and responsibilities of the FPFWC. Another has been
the workshops which have become the backbone of
these conventions as this is where the active exchange
of ideas and sharing of experiences take place among
the delegates.
A special highlight of the FPFWC is the Saturday
night cultural affair wherein a variety of cultural presentations
have been shown throughout the years.
Philippine cultural dances as well as full stage performances
such as the play lsuda Ti lmuna have been
some of the grand presentations shown in these
evenings.
Lastly, the convention ends with a final general
assembly where workshop reports and resolutions are
presented to the whole convention assembly for discussion
and approval. This activity-packed convention
schedule is additionally featured with cultural
entertainment during meal breaks and ample opportunities
to get to know other delegates from other
areas. The whole convention is capped with a dance
on Sunday evening.
SUCCESSFUL FAR WEST
CONVENTIONS (FWC'S)
The Berkeley FWC (1975) drew 500 delegates to
an action-packed convention. There were two major
resolutions which created two working bodies aimed
at: a) developing unity among Filipino students in the
West Coast, resulting in the successful formation of
the West Coast Confederation of Filipino Students
and which has since helped establish Filipino clubs
in many schools and universities in the West Coast;
b) the formation of an active body of educators and
concerned community leaders, the Education Task
Force, whose goal was to initiate the correction of
t~~ ~istorical omissions and distortions concerning
Fi11p1nos and Filipino-Americans in textbooks used
by the various school districts in California.
The Seattle FWC (1976) attracted a broad spectrum
of people from the community drawing nearly
700 people representing a good balance of both the
old and young sectors. The Seattle Convention is the
most outstanding yet in achieving the broadest community
participation in the FWC's as delegates met in
~orkshops and confronted some of the more pressing
issues of the day such as the licensure barriers faced
by Philippine-trained professionals, how to build
strong student organizations, the discriminatory
character of social science textbooks used in the
schools, and many more. In the cultural field, a community
grass roots play Tagatupad was performed on
Saturday evening portraying the Seattle Filipino
community's own history and the present struggle
of low-income housing in Seattle's International
District.
The San Diego FWC (1977) had another record
attendance of 600 people. The Convention was particularly
significant in that it took to discussion all
the pressing issues of the day. Filipino senior citizens
evicted from the International Hotel struggle in San
Francisco were speakers on the serious housing problems
confronting elderly citizens of minority communities
throughout the country. Farmworkers and
labor leaders were also present to speak of their
plight in the central valleys of California and the
canneries in Alaska.
1978 FPFWC THEME: Unite and Fight
for Our Rights
This year's theme acknowledges the many struggles
Filipinos are involved in all over the country.
Struggles such as the fight for fair licensure by Filipino
medical workers and those of other professions as
well as the victorious fight of Narciso and Perez
against an attempted FBI frame-up for a crime they
did not commit demonstrate our community's growing
recognition of the need to defend our democratic
rights and fight for those denied to us.
While the theme reflects this growing political
maturation of our community, it also calls on us to
further build on this and hasten this growth. Many
cases of injustices faced by Filipinos and other nonwhite
minorities still go unchallenged requiring of us
a greater effort to check any national or racial discrimination
we may encounter. Lastly, the theme
provides a most meaningful purpose on which to
forge unity among Filipinos under a common goal
and direction.
THE 1978 FPFWC'S POINTS OF UNITY
The 1978 FPFWC, which is scheduled to be held
at UCLA during the Labor Day weekend at the end
of the summer, has adopted the following points of
unity.
1. As a minority community here in the U.S. it is
the convention's goal to forge community awareness
of the national and racial discrimination it faces in
this country and to uphold Filipinos' democratic
right to equal employment, education, housing, health
services, and other basic rights enjoyed by all citizens
of this country.
2. Because Filipinos have maintained and continue
to keep ties with the homeland, the FPFWC sees the
need to take an active concern of the existing conditions
and present situation in the Philippines. It hopes
to accomplish this by providing the forum where
convention delegates can be informed and updated
of developments unfolding in the homeland.

To be successful, the 1978 FPFWC needs your
help and support.
D I want to attend the Convention. Please
send a registration form.
D Please send me more information about
the 1978 FPFWC and include me on your 1
mailing list.
D I can donate to help defray the costs of
the convention. Enclosed is $
Name
Address
City
State
Telephone# __ _
Area Code
Zip

Unite an
WHAT IS THE FILIPINO PEOPLE'S FAR
WEST CONVENTION?
The Filipino Peoples Far West Convention
(FPFWC) first began in 1971 marking Filipinos'
av,akening to the realities faced by our community
here in the U.S. as part of the Civil Rights Movement.
Since then, the FPFWC has yearly brought together
Filipinos from all over the West Coast to discuss
pressing issues faced by our people as well as share
with each other common experiences as a minority
community in this country.
Going on its 8th year, the FPFWC has matured
into an organized and disciplined gathering of Filipinos
which has become commonly recognized with
the following main features. One is the general assembly
which has traditionally opened the convention
with speakers addressing the delegates on the tasks
and responsibilities of the FPFWC. Another has been
the workshops which have become the backbone of
these conventions as this is where the active exchange
of ideas and sharing of experiences take place among
the delegates.
A special highlight of the FPFWC is the Saturday
night cultural affair wherein a variety of cultural presentations
have been shown throughout the years.
Philippine cultural dances as well as full stage performances
such as the play /suda Ti lmuna have been
some of the grand presentations shown in these
evenings.
Lastly, the convention ends with a final general
assembly where workshop reports and resolutions are
presented to the whole convention assembly for discussion
and approval. This activity-packed convention
schedule is additionally featured with cultural
entertainment during meal breaks and ample opportunities
to get to know other delegates from other
areas. The whole convention is capped with a dance
on Sunday evening.
SUCCESSFUL FAR WEST
CONVENTIONS (FWC'S)
The Berkeley FWC (1975) drew 500 delegates to
an action-packed convention. There were two major
resolutions which created two working bodies aimed
at: a) developing unity among Filipino students in the
West Coast, resulting in the successful formation of
the West Coast Confederation of Filipino Students
and which has since helped establish Filipino clubs
in many schools and universities in the West Coast;
b) the formation of an active body of educators and
concerned community leaders, the Education Task
Force, whose goal was to initiate the correction of
t
f
t
For General lnformat/On
Coordinator
CONTACT:
Jaime Geaga
Rafael Orpilla
Marilou Perez
Joe Palicte
or
(273} 673-7520
(273) 677-3857
(273) 778-7069
(273} 834-2722
Send Letters To:
7978 FPFWC
University of California
Asian American Studies Center
3232 Campbell Hall
Los Angeles, California 90024
Please pass on to a friend.
-.:::t"
N
0
0
°'

WELCOME,
We are very pleased that you are participating in this fundraiser
to send delegates to the Filipino Peoples Far West Convention.
Wilh your help, the people listed on the next page will have an
opportunity to attend the convention.
What is the Filipino Peoples Far West Convention? Since 1971
Filipinos from throughout the west coast have annually attended
the convention and discussed key issues of concern in the Filipino
Community. Delegates from Hawaii, Seattle, and Northern Californi·
have attended consistently in the past. Those delegates passed
resolutions insuring the working character of the convention.
Therefore, the Far West Convention not only serves as the meeting
place of many Filipinos, but as a huge symposium of sharing ideas,
experiences and workable resolutions.
We hope that you enjoy yourselves today. And don't forget the
Disco Dance tonight when the trophies will be awarded to the
winning teams from the Volleyball and Basketball tourneys.
Salamat,
SACRAMENTO FILIPINO PEOPLES
FAR WEST CONVENTION DELEGATION COMMITTEE
P.S. Keep this program so you can use the map on the back
to use as directions to the dance.

TENTATIVE DELEGATES TO THE FAR WEST CONVENTION :
1. Mr . & Mrs . Aglubat
2 . Tessie Aglubat
3, Al Balinguit
4, Bernard Beckker
5, Mr. & Mrs. Wa1•ren Bon ta
6, Greg Galeste
7, Ferd Galvez
8 . Sonja Jhao
9 , Mr, & Mrs, Mazon
1 0 . Jay Paular
11, Mr . Jerry Paular
1 2 , Paul Paular
1 J . Malinda Pedregosa
1 4, Pre scilla Pedregosa
1 5. Terri Pedregosa
r6. Domingo Pilorin
1 7 • Dolores Pizarro Jr.
1 8. Donny Pizarro
1 9 . Lee Pl awn
2 0 . Paul Porras
2 1 • Gary Reyes
22, Ted Sanchez Jr.
23 , Carmelita Sarte
24, Remea Veia
2 5, Rone Vergura
26. Sonny Vergara
2 7 • Becky Villones
28 . Diane Villones
2 9 • I rene Villones
30. Maxie Villones
31. Nina Fenkell

THE STOCKTON BRUINS
LARRY LEDESMA
KENNY QUILDARINO
JIMMY ZULUETA
RAOUL ROSAL
TEDDY ROSAL
EAGLES
FRANK OROSCO
MIKE HARRIS
MIKE RABAGO
CARINE NAVIDAD
HENRY CASTILLO-CAPTAIN
STEPHEN J RAMBONGA
BRIAN L RAMBONGA
GREGORY F RAMBONGA
RICK TECZON
SID CALIJA
ROCKY ARONG
LARRY RIN
MIKE KEESEE
ROBERT TERRANSE
STOCKTON FILS
MANNY ALFONSO-CAPTAIN
PETER BASILIO
DANNY BASILIO
JOE BASILIO
GONSALO TABOIS
MARK TABIOS
JORGE CASILLAS
JOSE VALLE
BENNY WYATT
MANUOL BONZO
SILANGAN
DANTE ANCHETA-CAPTAIN
HENRY LORENZO
RUBEN QUIAOIT
DANNY RABENA
ROLAND JOHNSON
ALEX ENGLISH
LEVI AREVALO
MANUEL ANCHETA
JUNIOR MANZANO
BENNY INES
ROMEO ASPIRAS
B A S K E T B A L L
FIL- AM TRAVEL
ALVIN MANG I NDIN-CO-CAPTAIN
GEORGE PEDREGOSA- CO-CAPTAIN
DALE YURONG- CO- CAPTAIN
LOYD ROLLE
LARRY WALKER
LEONARD CLEMENTE
ARNELL AGDIPA
ALAN AMEN
DRAGONS
LESTER VERGARA-CAPTAIN
SONNY VERGARA
JIMMY VERGARA
RAYMOND BALTAZAR
REYNALDO BALTAZAR
RICKY PLAZA
JEFF ?
TAMARAW
TONY BJ.SCO
RUDY MENDEZ
ARTHUR PAYAWAL
JAY PAULAR-CAPTAIN
RUDY ALLIEZA
TERRY RIVERA
NOY CHURIDIAN
VIC RIVERA
STEVE GUEVAIA JR
GREG GALESTE
MALAKAS
JOHN PANETA
ANDERSON ENGLISH
TONY PAGANAY
MARLON GUANZON-CAPTAIN
MANOLO COLON
NATHON NAVARRETE
ALFRED LANDIS
ROY GALARPE
GEORGE GUANZON
WILLIE BULDA
NESTOR FERNANDEZ
MARLON GUANZON
SANTE PERRERAS


MAJOR TEAMS
ZO()NIES 2. VILLAGE PEOPLE
TIM FENKELL-CAPTAIN FIL VILLONES-CAPTAIN
MIKE ITO LUCIE VILLONES
CAROL KURAHARA BRENDA HAILEY
IRENE VILLONES JUDY TAKEUCHI
LIZ FENKELL MARLENE TSUJITO
DAN EBBERTS STEVE MC WILLIAMS
BOB WEBSTER
3. PALAQUEROS
PETE? - CAPTAIN
LANZE?
TONI ?
ELENOR?
JUNEAVE?
CINDY?
STEVEN?
JERRY KASIWADA
THE GANG 5. VALLEJO
EDMUND VASQUEZ-CAPTAIN VERA SENCIL-CAPTAIN
MARLINE PEDREGOSA JORGE SENCIL
PRESCILLA PEDREGOSA DWAYNE ORIARTE
MALINDA PEDREGOSA BOB PANGELINAN
LLOYD ROLLE JEANNE KOLDA
WAYNE? RON GARTON
GARY GARTON
MINOR TEAMS
CHOCOLATE MEAT 2. SACTO VOLLEYS
ALEJA RAMBONGA-CAPTAIN TED SANCHEZ JR-CAPTAIN
MICKAEL RUBIANES DICK MAZON
ARTHUR ZULUETA ANTHONY PADENA
ANDREA HARRIS KATHY VILLONES
DAVID RUBIANES LEE PFLAUM
LIZ ZULUETA TOM WONG
JIM ZULUETA MARY WONG
MARY AYUPAN JOEY FORTES
FRED AYNAGA BENITA?
BENITA VALENCIA NANCY CALHOUN
3. KYDZ
EDDIE EVANGELISTA-CAPTAIN
LEO EVANGELISTA
CRIS GALESTE
MANUEL GALESTE
JOE GARCIA
PRISCILLA GARCIA
DANNY HERNANDEZ
LYDIA HERNANDEZ
VANGIE MENESES
VINCE MENESES
PAUL'S TEAM 5. DISCO VOLLEY
PAUL PORRES-CAPTAIN RICHARD MACASIEB-CAPTA
TERRI PEDREGOSA OSCAR ABAIR
JUNBOY RABANIL JAMES HERRIQUES
A. REMULAT LILETTE CRISOLOGO
KELLY TEESON LYRA CRISOLOGO
DEBBIE CLAVEJO LYRIC SAYSON
LEO CABANERO NANCY KREMER
REN CRISOLOGO

SPECIAL THANKS ARE EXTENDED TO THE FOLLOWING COMMITTEE MEMBERS
WHOSE TIME AND EFFORTS MADE OUR TOURNAMENT AND DANCE POSSIBLE:
TOURNAMENT OUTREACH
1 • Kiki Bermudez 1 • Cyn Bonta
2 . Liz Fenkell 2. Diane Galeste
3. Tim Fenkeli J. Greg Galeste
4. Ferd Galvez 4. Jan Gorre
s. Marlon Guanzon s. Mrs. Gorre
6. Sam Haloyoloy 6. Marline Pedregosa
7. Dick Mazon 1. Domingo Pilorin
8. Edmund Pambio 8. Dolores Pizarro
9. Jay Pau}ar 9. Dolores Pizarro, Jr.
10. Mrs. Rabena 10. Donny Pizarro
11. Ted Sanchez, Jr.
12. Kathy Villones
1 3. Lester Vergara
14. Sonny Vergara REGISTRATION
15. Fil Villones 1 • Rosie Gaters
16. Lucy Villones 2. Norma Pena
~
1. Bernard Beckker
2. Gary Reyes
3, Rolle Vergara

SPONSORSHIPS
1. AKO
2. Anti-Martial Law Alliance
J. Camelia Lodge
4. Filipino Community of Sacram'mto & Vicinity
S. Filipino 3tudent Alliance of Sacramento
6. Union of Democratic Filipinos
7. Visnyan Club
8. SFACC
9. Congress of Filipino American Citizens

The Sacramento Filipino Peoples Far West Convention Delegation
would like to thank the following people for their donations
without whom this fundraiser couldn't have been a success.
MR. TED SANCHEZ SR.
MR. DOMINGO PILORIN
DR. TONEL
DR. MONTEMAYOR
MRS. M. VALDEZ
MR. LEO BAUTISTA
MR. PASTOR ENGKABO
MR. JERRY PAULAR SR.
RIVERA PRODUCTIONS
JR. RIVERA
MRS. FONTINILLA
BOBBIE AGWBUT
MR. VINCENT REYES SR.
MR. ED BANSUELO
ESPERANZA CARE HOME
MRS. GRACE IGNACIO
MR. & MRS. FRANK EDRALIN
MR. STAN QUINTO
MR. LAWRENCE AYSON - FIL AM TRAVEL
MR. CONSTANTJNO VERGARA
FLORIN ROAL TOYOTA
MR. FRANK FORTEZ




October Jv, 19/8
Attention: To the core of the Los Angeles Filipino People's
Far West Convention
From : The Sacramento Filipino People's Far West
Convention lnterim Committee
Maligayang araw sa inyong lahat.
We are writing to investigate the possiblity of holding a meet~n3
1n Sacramento with somewne who had worked in the core of the FWC
held recently in Los Angeles.
We are presently in the planning stages of our work and feel that,
in rdo~ for us to see the complete picture of what lies ahead for
us, sharing the problems, the framework of the convention, and the
lessons of previous FWC nosts ahead of time, would enable us to
avoid costly errors. Topics of the meeting would include:
1. budget 6. registration set-up
2. facilities 7. security
J. problem areas
4. materials
8. food
9. convention schedule
5. committees 10. f1.m.draisers
We have set aside the weekend of October 21st & 22nd as the
tentative meeting date with your representative. We plan to fund
the trip and pr vide _ ·0 1 and accommodat~ons forte weekend. e
hope to share our valley experiences by traveling aoout the
·•acr1mento aommunity and vicinity. lf it appears that no one will
be availRble, may we request that a copy of bhe framework of the
.• · , which would include the above areas, to be sent to us
as an example in our work?
We are presently in the midst of researching for a site, po~sible
financial sources and fur.'raisers-, and in establishing a community
contacts list. The last weekend in October is when our findings will
be presented to the broader planning committee for ~pproval' · nd
more extensive research througi the smaller working committees.
Thus, it woULd . help us tremendously to hear from you as s~ca. ·s
possible.
The enthusiasm for a Sacramento Fv/~ is mounting and we h ·~a tv
~ontinue to make it grow through good and thorough planning.
Maraming salamat,
Members of the Sacrmancto ffPFW~ interim Committee


Attention: To the core of the Seattle Filipino People's
Far est ~onvention
From : The Sacramento Filipino People's Far est
~onvention interim Gommittee
Maligayang araw sa inyong lahat.
e are writing to investigate the possioility of holding a meeting
in Sacramento with someone who had worked in the core of the FW~
held in Seattle.
e are presently in the planning stages of our work and feel trat,
in order for us to see the complete picture of what lies ahead for
us, sharing tne proolems, the framework of tre convention, and
lessons of previous FWG hosts,ahead of time, would enable us to
avoid costly errors. Topics of the meeting wou d include:
1. budget 6. registration set-up
2. facilities 7. security
3. problem areas 8. food
4. materials 9. co rention schedule
5. committees 10. fundraisers
e have set aside the weekend of O tober 21st & 22nd as the
tent tive meeting date with your representative. We plan to
fund the trip and provide food and accommodations for +ho
weekend. e hope to s 0-3 our valley experiences· traveling
wi th our guest in the Sacramento community and vicinity. If it
appears that no one will be availaole, may we request that a
copy of the framework of the Seattle F G, which would include
the above areas, be sent t o us as an example for us in our work?
e are presently in the midst of rese~rching for a site, possi~ 2
f.inancial sources and fundraisers, and in est?olishing a community
contacts list. The last weekend in Octooer is when our findings
will be presented to the broader planning committee for approval
and more extensive research th ugh the smaller working committees.
Thus, it would help us tremendou· ly to hear from you as soon as
possib~a ~.
The enthusiasm for a Sacramento FWG is mounting and we hmpe to
continue to make it gro t, .ou~ good and thorough planning.
Maraming salamat,
• Members of the Sacramento FPFWG lnterim Committee





Filipino People's Far West Convention Summation Report\
The summation meeting discus'' d the three periods : pre-fwc,
fwc and post fwc. The general ft ""iling was very positive . There
were particular criticisms for improvement in regards to the tourny
fundrc:iiser . However, overall thE. outreach and support for the
Dclee;o.tion Committee was Good. Ttm organizations :supported and
c:nclorsed the FWC. Many individua_s gave support, und committed
themselves if the FWC was to be teld in Sacramento in ' 79 .
In the came light the delegation committee felt the LA FWC
was very good. Many delegates fElt positive about their participation
overall. There were on~ a few workshops with any real
difficulties . Sacramento experiences were 1&red and ~efined ideas
from the FWC hav~ been brought b-:l.ck to the ~ J.C r·amento Community.
The delegation itself had a well roundc~ character ; students
(Sac City, Sac State, UCD King HaJl), youth (AKO , Filipinana,
Delta), workers (telephone, state, teacher[..·, cL·.:.vate ~ector,ect .)
Also, all generations, all waves of imrnigr.:it~o 1s were represented .
A total of 39 delegates from Sacramento atteudrc the LA FWC. 35
of whom rode together in the bus to LA. The whole bus ride was
high spirited, reflecting the unity of the delegated wi~h the FWC.
This spirit remains high in anticipation of hosting the '79 FWC.
With this experience the delegation Committee could see how
the FWC serves as a unifying force to fight for justice. The FWC
has become known as a gathering activity for community leaders
to share and discuss the struggle against injustice. Not figure
heai corru,,>.l.I.~~ ty lE::ader·s, bur., tnose who re all¥ worK ! or -:.he community.
The points of unity clearly reflect this: 1) unite to fight racial
and national discrimination and; 2) be concerned with the conditions
of the Philippines.
For the Deleg~tion Committee hosting the convention meant
bringing into this 1 united struggle against injustices the SacrarnunLo
unc.l whole Valley area. Why does the Delegnt.ion Committee
f'c'('l Lhis p.:irticipation lo so important? The '78 FWC was the
j cth annual convention. For the Sacto area the '78 conventil)Tl
w:1~.:. the first time a delegation represented the whole community •
. The rich exchanged of exp8riencos, analysis, and working resoluLion~
are invaluable for all Filipino communi~ies to gain from.
For many years the valley has been regarded as a political
vacume, in terms of political action. The FWC offers to open up
a ' new dawn,' Silayan', a new awakening. The Sacramneto Delegation
Cc;1nn1i tee would like to share this new spirit of unity Valley-wid •
'l'h<.; vu. lley has much to offer and many resources and unutili zed
putenLials.
The Sact,o committee plans for the particpation of the whole
v·illey. Step by setp encouraging and winning unity with the majorlty
of the Filipino Community to the FWC points of unity. To
do so the Delegation Committee has assigned an interim FWC '79
Planning Committee. This interim is assigned to foundation bld.
This means planning the overall approach of the FWC, set into
motion preparation work, take care of the site and overall generally
lay out a plan for the year's work. Volunteers were taken
.:·or the interim committee: Derek Ledda, Dick Mazon, Donny Pizarro,
Eli Aquino, Jerry Paular, Jay Paular, Liz Fenkel, Marline Pedregosa,
Maxi Villane, Tim Fenkel, Rolly Vergara.
Following is the plan of the interim committee.


P.O. Box 161964, SACRAMENTO, CA. 95816 PHONE (916) 392-7950
NEWSLETTER
Dear Fri ends,
With only three weeks away,
the 1979 Filipino People's Far
~est Convention is fast approaching'.
And the Sacramento Filipino
Community is busting with energy
while completing all the final
preparation work for a successful
'79 Convention.
Volume t
The Convention planning has
thrust many into a new realm of
unity during this past year.
Those organizations and individuals
who might in the past have
found it difficult to work together,
have challenged the old
"Filipinos can't unite" stereo~
ype ~nd_replaced it with unity
1n bu1ld1ng the progressive institution,
the Filipino Peoole's
Far West Convention. To date,
there are over 60 people involved
and five sponsoring organizations
with many more supporting
organizations and individuals.
The convention has
been a major undertaking for
Rise To The Call For ACTION!
the Sacramento community.
Within this past year, there
has surfaced many issues for concern
which directly relate to
Proposition 13 and the rights
of new immigrants. In particular
: the Filipino Community
essential community-based
social services have been drastically
cut, Filipino teachers
fired by the dozens, the quality
of education further threatened,
and new immigrants harassed and
scapegoated, etc. These issues
have already gained national
prominence and bid the Filipino
Community to 11 RISE TO THE CALL
FOR ACTI ON! 11 These two major
subjects have been chosen to be
presented to the General Body
at the opening session, to provide
a detailed analysis of the issues.
. , The convention program has
again been planned to include a wellrounded
experience for the delegates,
beginning with the Community Pot
Luck Friday nite, to an Opening
Session and lfork hops with a fine
cultural play 11C r lng, a War Bride 11
on Saturday evening,\ followed on
Sunday with morni g workshops, an
afternoon final s ssion, dinner,
and then dancing.
v!E LOOK FOR\>!AfD TO YOUR
PARTICIPATicfrt IN THE
1979 FPFWC!
The 1979 Filipino People's
Far West Convention marks
the 9th annual gathering
of concerned Filipinos
from throughout the West
Coast to discuss pressing
issues faced by our community
as a minority people in this
country. An outgrowth of
the progressive movements of
the 60's against racism
and inequality, the FWC has
become an educational and
organizing forum uniting
the Filipino community on
a common perspective and
program of action for
social and political change.
This year's FWC, to be
held for the first time
in Sacramento, has chosen
the theme, "Rise to the
Call for Action" with the
goals :
Organize the Unorganized
Break with Passivity
Build Solid and Strong
Unity in the Community.
This is because the
Filipino community has progressed
beyond cultural
identity to an awareness of
our common concerns and an
assertion of our basic
democratic rights. This
is reflected in the FWC ' s
points of unity, established
since 1975 at the Berkeley
FWC:
l)Maintain an awareness
of the national and racial
descrimination Filipinos
face in this country and
uphold our democratic
rights to equal employment,
education, housing,
health services, and all
the basic rights enjoyed
in this country.
2)Maintain our ties with
the homeland through an
active concern about the
existing conditions jn
the Philippines.
AT A MOMENT'S
Due to the abrupt closure
of the Senator Hotel, all
housing and on-site registrations
are r elocating to
th Mans ion Inn, 700-16th
Street (16th & H Streets).
Del gat s arriving by air
or bus, pl ase make arrangements
for this last minute
change .
Pr -re6istration dadline
is now moved to August
15th ... Add $5.00 late
charg aft r this date .

I
SACRAMENTO '79
Fil ipino People's
Far West Convention
tivit to the social,
community, personal, family ,
and political pressures
that affect the Filipino
n wc m r . Suggest d
topi s: The function of
th IS; immigrants '
rights; 1 gal procedures ;
making th cul tural t ranssition
; services available
to the immigran ts ; deport
a tion problems. This
will be a two-day workshop.
PHILIPPINE CONDITIONS -
In accordance with the
principles of unity of the
convention, one of which
is to maintain our ties
with the Philippines
through an active concern
about existing conditions
there, this workshop
will provide an update on
the political, economic,
and social conditions of
the Filipino people under
martial law, striving to
reflect an all-sided view
of the situation.
Suggested topics: The
new Bases Agreement;
political "Normalization"
of the Marcos regime;
l and reform; multinational
corporations; U.S. military
aid to the Philippines;
the resistance movement.
This will be a two-day
workshop.
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EMPLOYMENT
- This workshop will
address the broad problems
of Filipinos in finding
and maintaining employment
in the context of the
affirmative action concept.
The implication to Filipino
wo r ke r s of Title VII of
the Civil Rights Act, the
Bakke and Web er cases, and
other s i gni f icant developments
will be brought out
fo r ana l ysis. Ways to
ac t ively protect, and
benefit f r om, a f firmative
action righ t s will a lso
be examined. Suggested
questions fo r discussi on:
What is Affirma t ive Ac tion?
What shoul d be done to
ensure the rights of Fi lipino
workers? What kind of
attacks have been made
against affirmative action?
This workshop will absorb
other workshops as indicated
in their description .
PROPOSITION 13 - This
workshop d als with an issue
that hits all middle and
1ow-incom people, of which
the Filipino ommunity is
a part. An ducation
around th meaning, implications
and ff cts that
Proposition 13 has on our
sentor citizens, welfare
r cipi nts, youth, and
education is necessary in
ord r for us to defend our
rights actively and jointly
wi t h others outside t he
Filipino communi t y who
have been j ust as gravely
affe c t ed. This workshop
will abs orb other works hop'
as indicated i n their
descriptions.
Outreach Committee
Sacramento
Co-;ivention Center
August 31 - September 2
q a.-wi.
The Outreach Committee is now in the process of stepping
up its visitation work with different social and civic organizations,
groups, as well as individuasl in the Sacramento area.
To date 120 individuals from the immediate Sacramento area and
from other parts of the West Coast have registered for the '79
FPFWC. In this pre-registerd group 50 are from the local area.
As yet, the full potential of the entire working body of
the FPFWC has not been totally harnessed to actively get our
community to participate and register for the convention. The
significance of bringing together the greatest number of Filipinos
to actively review, discuss and identify the key issues which
affect our Filipino Community can only result in a stronger
united spirit and action that will hopefully lead to a stronger
and more united effort of our Filipino Community in Sacramento.
Therefore, we encourage every individual, group and every
workingmember and supporter of the FPFWC organization to tell
your relatives, friends arid co-workers about the convention.
Invite them to have a member of the outreach committee contact
thew and make a formal presentation on the convention. Or, give
us a telephone call and tell us the names of those you would like
us to contact and we will get in touch with them and make all the
necessary arrangements to visit them.
With all of us working together, unified on the recognition
that the FPFWC will be a significant step forward for all Filipinos
in Sacramento, lets all make a pledge to minimally get two
other people who know about the FPFWC to register to attend. -
Finance Committee
Income as of August 9, 1979
Income as of August 9, 1979
revenue
Volleyball tourney
Variety Show
Vanguard Foundation
Souvenir Program
Registration fees
Expen ses Projected
Food
Program
Convention Center
Hotel
Childcare
Entertainment
Publi city
Registration
Deficit
$ 125.00
212.00
1,500.00
400.00
2,260.00
$4,497.00
$3,986.00
600.00
2,285.00
5,000.00
144.00
900.00
1,500.00
105.00
$14,520 . 00
$10,023.00
. The Finance Comm ittee i s working very hard to meet the pro-
Jec~e~ _expenses _of the ent ire FPFWC. We are in the process of
soliciting donations for t he convention. Donors will have their
names o. r the name of the 1· r o rga n1· za t i·o n or bus i·n ess pri·n ted in the souvenir program.


Dear
.
The Filipino community of Sacramento is hosting the Nineth
Annual 1979 Filipino People Far West Covention. The FPFWC will take
place in the Sacramento Community Convention Center on August 31st,
Sept. 1st, and 2nd. Enclosed is a brochure of the Far West Convention
giving more detail and the perspective of the convention.
The Far West Convention is the most important and unifying event
on the West Coast for Filipinos communities because of the impact it
makes on the progressive sector;(l) it enables us to give more focus
on the problems facing all sectors of the Filipino community,(2) a
direction is developed in dealing with these problems through thorough
struggles in the workshops, as delegates develop resolutions to imp~ement
in their respective communities, (3) it is the largest gathering of the
most concerned and active Filipino community leaders who are striving
for unity, collectivity, and action in their communities; and FPFWC
gives strength to this movement by exposing the issues and concerns and
gaining unity with delegates who have come because of mutual concern
in our continual struggle against national and racial discrimination
and for our concern about the conditions in the Philippines and US
policies regarding the Philippines as they affect immigrants and FilipinoAmericans.
As an editor, we feel you have the major responsibility of the level
of coverage we would get on the convention. To the broader -community,
the FPFWC may not seem too important, but to the Filipino community, the
impact is much deeper and lasting. Any media coverage on the convention
will have an impact; thus we know that the type of media coverage the
FPFWC gets will impact its level of importance to the community. As
concerned Filipinos we feel the media should take a more active role in
providing proper and accurate coverage to this West Coast wide gathering,
as poor coverage continues in building of stereotypes and backward ideas
of our people and the broader American public. We appreciate what coverage
we got for the Philippine National Day, but we would like more depth
in the approach and in the contents.
We know the media has a large responsibility in shaping the community's
image of itself and for this reason we request, as editor , you take this
as a serious concern when assigning coverage for the Convention. As a
tool, the media can be of a great aid in the progressive movement of
Filipinos, but can only be so if conscious accurate reporting is implemented
and your role is vital in this movement. The progressive movement
will not stop, but will sharpen its struggles until the quality of
reporting and coverage meets our rising standards and needs. By standing

Filipino People Far West Convention
Page Two
by the unities of the Convention, we make our Convention t~me and
slogans alive and real.
We seriously hope that you will take this into account as you
cover this event and others in the future. As the third largest minority
in the U.S., our visibility has been very low-key, but with the
development of a progressive movement in our community, a low-key
stance is no longer proper, thus our standards and demands must also
rise in all aspects of our lives, socially and politically. You are a
key factor with the link that you have in the community. We sincerely
hope to continue in developing a good working relationship with you as
our community grows. Don't let us down.
Sincerely,
Publicity Committee
SUGGESTIONS FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION COPY
Radio Public Service Announcements
1. Proper form: Name of organization
Address and telephone number
Name of person submitting copy
Date copy is delivered
Dates copy is to run
(This information placed in either corner at top of page.)
2. Just one announcement to a page. (See directory for
number of copies of each announcement preferred by
individual stations.)
3. Copy should be timed to station preference. (See
directory for preferred lengths.) 25 words=:10;
50 words=:20; 75 words=:30; 150 words=:60.
4. All copy should be written in third person.
5. Telephone exchanges, street names, titles, etc.; should
be written in full. Abbreviations can be confusing.
6. Copy should arrive at station as far in advance of
release date as possible.
7. Copy should be addressed to public service director or
person originally contacted.
Name of Agency
Address
Contact: : Your name
Date
:60
(sample form:
RADIO SPOT
(copy here)
"
-14-
radio PSA)
Starting date:
Length of spot:
Ending date:

(Sample Release Form)
Name of Agency
Address
Telephone
Contact: Your Name
Date
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (release date)
(start copy here)
(If necessary to continue release to additional pages,
indicate by the word "more" at the bottom of pre·ceding
page, indicate conclusion of release by a series of#-#-#)
(If story includes pictures, each picture should have a
separate sheet with the agency heading at the top of pa~e.
Number pictures for sequence if several are included. Do
not use paper clips. Scotch tape just the edge of the sheet
to the back of the picture and fold the copy over the picture
face.)
-8-


WHAT IS THE FILIPINO PEOPLE'S
FAR WEST CONVENTION?
The 1979 Filipino People's Far West Convention
marks the 9th annual gathering of concerned
Filipinos from throughout the West Coast to discuss
pressing issues faced by our community as a
minority people in this country. An outgrowth of the
progressive movements of the 60's against racism
and inequality, the FWC has become an educational
and organizing forum uniting the Filipino community
on a common perspective and program of
action for social and political change.
This year's FWC, to be held for the first time in
Sacramento, has chosen the theme, "Rise to the Call
for Action" with the goals:
• Organize the Unorganized
• Break with Passivity
• Build Solid and Strong Unity in the Community
This ,s because the Filipino community has progressed
beyond cultural identity to an awareness of
our common concerns and an assertion of our basic
~emocratic rights. This is reflected in the FWC's
points of unity, established since 1975 at the
fBerkeley FWC:
1) Maintain an awareness of the national and
racial discrimination Filipinos face in this country
and uphold our democratic rights to equal employment,
education, housing, health services, and all
the basic rights enjoyed in this country.
2) Maintain our ties with the homeland through an
active concrn about the existing conditions in the
Philippines.
PROGRAM
Friday
Friday will open the Convention with Sacramento
supporters welcoming local and out-of-town delegates
to a potluck and informal cultural presentation.
This will provide an opportunity for delegates to
meet each other while workshop facilitators and
resource persons from throughout the West Coast
meet for final preparations. Registration begins at
1:00 p .m.
Saturday
The 1979 Filipino People's Far West Convention
will convene with an educational General Assembly
at the Sacramento Convention Center to set the
perspective and goals for the next two days.
Prominent Filipinos involved in key struggles in the
community will address the Assembly. A multimedia
presentation by the Sacramento Filipino
community will follow, chronicling the Filipino
people's struggles and the forging of unity in this
effort. The Convention workshops and plenary
sessions will be the heart of the Convention where
the many issues of the Filipino community will be
discussed in more detail. The workshops will focus
on key issues or special problems facing different
sectors of the community.
The workshops will be:
1-DAY SESSION:
Saturday
Employment
Labor
Senior Citizens
Youth and Education
Unity in the Community
2-DA Y SESSION:
Saturday and Sunday
Art and Culture
Immigration Problems
Philippines Today
Sunday
Affirmative Action
Propositon 13
SATURDAY NIGHT CULTURAL PRESENTATION
"Claring: A War Bride," an original musical
drama with songs and dance portraying the experiences
of a typical Filipino family in America
during the post-World War II period. Written and
directed by Ermena M. Vinluan, the drama will
premiere at the FWC before its projected West
Coast tour in the Fall. The production will be staged
by Singing Bayan (People's Art), a community
theatre group from the San Francisco-Bay Area .
SUNDAY
Workshops will come to a close after the morning
sessions. Reports, resolutions and proposed plans of
action will be presented from each workshop at the
General Assembly.
A dance that evening will cap the Convention d ~;
delegates say their farewell until next year .
REGISTRATION AND ACCOMODA TIONS
All housing accomodations and registration will be at
the Senator Hotel (12th & L) in Downtown Sacramento
across from the Capitol Mall. Convention proceedings will
be held at the Sacramento Convention Center two blocks
away. Registration starts at 1 ·00 p.m. August 31.
Convention materials, passes to all Convention events
and seven meals will be provided as part of the basic
registration packet of $25. Overnight accomodat1ons for
Friday and Saturday night at the Hotel will be an additional
$10. Discounts for Senior Citizens and children 14 years
old and under are available. Childcare will be provided for
free at the YWCA. Delegates arriving by plane have at their
convenience the air taxi from the airport for a $2 fee.
To assure accomodations and logistical preparations.
pre-registration is due by August 1. Late registration fees
received afterwards or made at the site will be charged an
additional $5.

THE PROGR !
FRIDAY
.t<'riday will open thP Convention with Sacram
nto community supporters w~lcoming local
and out-of-town delegates-~to a potluck dinner
and informal cultur~E presentation. This will
'
provide an opportunity for delegates to meet
each other while workshop facilitators and resource
pP.rsons from throughout the West Coast
meet final preparations. Registration
will begin at 100 p.m.
SAT RD Y
The 1979 Filipino People's Far West
Convention will convene with an educational
General ssembly in the Yolo Room of the Sacaamento
Convention Center. to
and goals for the next two days.
set the p
Filipinos involved in key struggles of the
pee ve
community will address the ssembly. multimedia
pr~sentation by the acra~ento Filipino
,
community will foilow, chronicling the ~ilipino
/
people's strugglP for justice and equality and
th~ forging of unity »·~~in this effort.
The Convention workshops and plenary
sessions will be the heart of the Convention
whPre thPmany issu0 s of the Filipino community
will be discussed in more detail. The workshops
will be on key issu~ ·- 'nd pr oblPms facing

RED & YELLOW NATUR L HIGH
LARRY JOHrSTO - CAPTAIN ERNEST MONTEZ - CAPTA IN
lIKE O ' DE.LL BETTY LIM
J OA r E O' DELL
TRI IB.ETT GOMLETS
'TA TIA WATSON
DENNIS WESTFALL
ZOONIES
TI FENKELL - CAPTAIN
LIZ FENKELL
DAN EBBERTS
FIL VI LLONES
GIGI APALIT
CONNIE GOMEZ
F.A.C.T.
PHILLIP FONG
LINDA HERNANDEZ
ANTONIO LARA
RON MOORE
DEAN KITADANI
LIZ DACONG
CATHY HARTLEY
EAST BAY SKYHAWKS
MARLON GUANZON - CAPTAIN
J AMES E:N"-RIQUES
RICHARD MAKASHI
LYRIE SAYSON
CLARE ABROIL
DESMOND NAVARES - CAPTAIN
KEN DUMAGUING
P IN10.{ BELTRAN
COREY GIN
CHRIS JAMERO
BARBARA ALVERNAZ
SHELLEY GONZALEZ
JENNIFER JAMERO
CAROL MERRITT
ELEANOR RAMOS
MOORE
DON MOORE - CAPTAIN
MANNY GARCIA
GRET OTA
ELLEN FRENCH
SHARON ADAMOWICZ
JANET FRASER
MARILYN COX
DON COX
KEN CHURCH
TIGERS
LITCOLN LEE - CAPTAIN
MAT WILLIAMS
RANDY FONG
CHRIS WONG
MARY WILLIAMS
JEYNIE LEE
FRA .-IC I3E r-EVES
DAVIDA DONG
HUI OHANA
RON SILVA - CAPTAIN
RAY GOMEZ
VIRGINIA KOU
BOB PAGE
RON SILVA
PAULA MILLIGAN
JUD ATWATER
MAL REMBULAT
CHERYL MAGDAEL
HIGH TIMES
ANDI MARTINEZ - CAPTAIN
CHARLIE BRUMLEY
JAMES MCLEOD
MIKE PANGELINA
JOHN OLEA
ROSA RODRIQUEZ
GRACE TURNER
CAROLYN GREEN
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
On behalf of the Sacramento Y.W.C.A. and the Filipino Peoplis Far West
Convention we would like to welcome and thank you for participating in our
co-ed volleyball tourney. Proceeds from this tourney will go towards buying
a new volleyball standard for the Y.W.C.A. and towards funding the Filipino
People~ Far West Convention.
This year marks the 9th annual convention and the first one to be sponsor
by the Sacramento Filipino Community. It will be held on Labor Day Weekend,
August 30th, September 1st & 2nd at the Sacramento Convention Center and at
the Senator Hotel. It will be a gathering of Filipinos from all over t he West
Coast to meet and share experiences and ideas. A c u ltural night a nd a da nce
usually highlight t he convention besides the ma ny workshops and genera l
assemblies. Registra t ion information will be available soon. For more information
writ e or call:
The Fil ipino Peopl es Far Wes t Convention
P .O. Box 161964
Sacramento , Ca. 958 16
(916) 392 - 79 50
Aga i n, thanks for p a r ticipa t ing , Good Luck, and h ave a good time ~

July 20, 1979
FACT SHEET
WHAT: 1979. FILIPINO PEOPLE'S FAR WEST CONVENTION
WHERE:
WHEN:
WHO:
SACRAMENTO COMMUNITY CONVENTION CENTER
SENATOR HOTEL - Housing and registration
( 12th & L St. )
AUGUST 31, SEPT. 1 & 2, 1979
Sacramento Filipino community and concerned individuals
FEE: REGISTRATION BEFORE AUGUST 1,1979
Commuter - $25.00
Overnight- 35.00
Seniors - 20.00 commuter
30.00 overnight
Children -
Commuter- 10.00
Overnight 15.00
Add $5.00 late registration fee a ·ter Aug 9 1st.
RESTRICTIONS: Must be r_gistered to attend the convention.
WHY: To provide a forum to discuss pressing issues
faced by the Filipino community as a minority
people in this country, through workshops and
General Assemblies, torgilig unity in their
common perspective for social and political
change.


FILIPI O GETTING DOWN TO BUSI ES AT
THE 19 79 SACRAMENTO FILIPINO EOPLE'S FAR ~EST CONVENTION
"RI~E TO THE CALL FOR ACT ION"
"BUV!ANGON TAY NG LAHAT AT MAGKAISANG KUMILOS PARA SA IKA UUNLAD
NG MGA FILIPINOS" is the theme of the 1979 Filipino People's Far West
Convention, marking its 9th year of gathering concerned Fili inos
from throughout the West Coast to discuss pressing issues affecting
the Filipino communities. The FPFWC will be hosted by the Filipino
community of Sacramento at the Sacramento Community Convention Center
on August 31, September 1 & 2. On-site registration and housing will
be accommodated at the Senator Hotel (12th & L St.), with registration
beginning on Aug. 31st, 1 p.m. We urge everyone to register
before August 1, as there is a penalty fee thereafter. Contact
Maxie Villones 392-7950, Jerry Paular 446-5195 or 428-8657 for
more information, OR write 1979 FPFWC F.O. Box 161964, Sacto.Ca. 95816.
The heart of the Far West Convantion are the workshops and
plenary sessions where the issues of the Filipino community are discussed
in more detail: issues such as the problems of immigrants in
licensure in the medical fields, discrimination in hiring practices,
the rights of senior citizens, affirmative action and employment,
and ~any more crucial issues. Delegates will also enjoy the cultural
presentation 11Claring, a Warbride", an original musical drama
with songs and dance portraying the experiences of a typical Filipino
family in America during the post-World War II period, by SINING
BAYAN (People's Art), a comm nity theatre group from the San Francisco
Bay area. A dance Sunday night will cap the Convention as delegates
say their farewells until next year. These plus all meals and the
meeting of so many people with a comm n perspective,will provide
an experien e nevvr to be forgotten.

Filipino People Far West Convention
Page Two
by the unities of the Convention, we make our Convention theme and
slogans alive and real.
We seriously hope that you will take this into account as you
cover this event and others in the future. As the third largest minority
in the U.S., our visibility has been very low-key, but with the
development of a progressive movement in our community, a low-key
stance is no longer proper, thus our standards and demands must also
rise in all aspects of our lives, socially and politically. You are a
key factor with the link that you have in the community. We sincerely
hope to continue in developing a good working relationship with you as
our community grows. Don't let us down.
Sincerely,
Publicity Committee

PHILIPPii~ES TODAY WORKSHOP SUftL\TION
In respecting the democratic rights of convention participan~
who were not able to go through the same process of educational
discussions in our workshop, the Philippines Today workshop has
decided not to introduce any resolution for the convention body
to vote upon. This is also in recognition of the fact that as
distinct froia other workshops, the Philippines Today inevitably
made judgments on the martial law.dictatorship. Thus, while we
believe most of the convention participants hold anti-martial law
sentiments, many of them may not be ready to vote on a resolution
because of anxiety ovar the possibility of retaliation. We
believe these anxieties should be respected for the go~d of the
whole convention.
The participants in our workshop reflected a diverse range
of ages, interests, and expectations. Young American uorn or· ~ ~
raised Filipinos came to find out what is happening in their
country of origin. Elders born and raised in the Philippines
came to be updated. 'Representatives of anti-martial law groups,
baseu both in the Filipino and broader American communities came
to share their views and experiences in organizing opposition to
the reg irae. rl.l though the Philippine Consulate formally informed
us of their inability to participate, Mro I-Ielicio Jacaban, former
publisher of Bataan News, represented the pro-martial law view
uurin~ Sunday's discussions.
The lively discussions were organized along the following
forrnat g economic con<litions, present political situation, and
alternatives to the present regime. The main limitation of the
workshop was tle limited time we had which restricted what
otherwise was a very spirited, and healthy exchange of views. ·
We realize that when you visit the Philippines, the existence
of martial law may not be immediately evident. The first things
you raay notice may be the impressive hotels, art centers and
clean streets. But behind all this are some things that require
a ·closer analysis.
~he minority opinion in the workshop asserts that along with
the hotels, art centers, and clean streets there have been many
positive things about martial law. They argued that martial law
has promoted peace and order, encouraged economic progress and
the development of commerce and natural resources, and instituted
land reform.

Page 2 (Phili~pines Today ••• )
However, an overwhelming majority of participants felt
strongly that1 based on well-researched information, the following
points represent the true economic and political conditions in
the Philippines~ ,
] • The ongoing armed resistance, both . in Mindanao and in
the remainder of the country, defy the claims of the Marcos regime
that there is peace. In fact, this resistance. is spreading and
increasing members of people are supporting the New People1 s
Armyo Horeover, the government itself perpetrates violence by
"salvaging0
, or systematically murdering suspected opponents of
the regime.
2. Economic conditions have become worse than ever under the
martial law regime. The minority claims that the econ~'nic ills
of the country are consistent with a worldwide pattern of
inflation and economic instability1 but these ills do not come ..
naturally. They are directly linked with the fact that the Philippine
economy is controlled by foreign investors, predominantly
UoS. corporations, whose profits are channelled back into the
U.S. and do not stimulate Philippine business to the point of
self-reliance. llarcos' policies have been generous to these
corporations because they keep him in power. So however true it
maybe that inflation (now up to 20% in the Philippines) is taking
place even in America, it follows that whatever adversely affects
tpe U.S. c9rpor~tions will also adversely affect the Philippines.
3. The land reform prograu of the martial law gove~nment
is a fare~. It is a -program designed by wealthy landlords and
means very little to peasants and small farmers who cannot even
afford to buy the land that the government claims is available
to them. On the other hand, those in power and huge foreign corporations
who supoort I-1arcos are given all the land they want •
. 4. Aside from contributing vastly to the economic failures of
the Philippines, the regime continues to be a repressive one.
It continues to violate the human rights of political dissenters,
a~though it has tried to hide these repre-sive policies with the
cloak of "normalizationu;. · -Furthermore, the people of the land
have no participation~in making laws since, under the ]976 referendum
which many peo~le acknowledge to have been the result 9f
fraudulent public voting - Marcos can veto even the Batasang •
Pa,mbansao With this kind of power, and the active support of
the U.S. government, 1-larcos is very confid P.n:t: of remaining as dictator.
The recent U.S. -RP bases agreement , which grants l'.iarcos
$500 million in military aid , is an example of how much the U.S.
is willing ta keep liarcos in power.

. .
Page 3 (PHilippines Today ••• )
'
Various alternatives were reviewed and discussed for their
merits. One alternative is constitutional democracy. This is
proposed by disenfranchised politicians who do not see the need
to change the whole social and economic system but only see the
need to replace Harcos and some of his policies. Another alter!""' •.
native is social democracy, adopted by some former politicians,
Jesuit priests and some students who see the need for reforms
but are not willing to dismantle fully U.So and foreign control
of the Philippine economy and the systan of landlordism. The
other alternative is the national democratic program which is fast
gaining popularity among workers, peasants, students and
intellectuals, religious, professionals and even nationalistic
E'ilipino capitalists. This alternative proposes to dismantle fully
landlordism by distributing lands to the landless, free the
Philippines from forei'gn economic domination by nationalizing
foreign investments and holdings and protecting native cap·~tal
and resources for the benefit of Filipinos. This alternative
proposes to raise the living standards of the majority while
promoting democratic freedoms of speech, religion, assembly
and assord.at:.ion under a coali_tin.n. government of all patriotic
forces who fought to overthrow the UoSo backed narcos dictatorship.
~his alternative sees that only national revolution can
topple a well-armed dictatorship but that this revolution has to
take place in a protracted process to ensure the participation
of the majority of the peopleo The workshop particit>ants generally
felt they would like to study and understand more about
this alternative. The workshop was also encouraged to support
the resistance movement fack home by particirating in or
supporting the activities of groups like the Lnti-!·1artial Law
Coalition.
Furthermore, as a workshop, we adopted the following
resolution.
We, the membe.rs of the workshop on Philippine Conditions
Today of this year's Filipino Peoples Far ~Jest Convention
hereby resolve~
] . We condemn the martial law dictatorship of I• arcos
in the Philippines and call for an end to martial law in the
Philippines.
2. We call for a restoration of civil liberties and human
rights in the Philip~ines, including restoration of freedom of
speech and the press.
3. lve call for the free<lom of all political prisoners in
the Philippines.
4. We call for an end of U.S. military and economic aid to
Harcos in the Philippines, and call for an end to economic
exploitation of the Philippines by U.S. corporations.

Page 4 (Philippi~es Todayo •. )
So Be it resolved, that we support united efforts to end
martial law in the Philippines.
This position was adopted by a vote of 34 yes, zero no
and)] abstantionso On the whoie, the workshop members over~.
whelmingly felt that the workshop discussions were informative,
thought-provoking and fruitful in strengthening our bonds with
the homeland and heigthening our patriotic concern over the
plight and fate of the Philippines and the Filipino people.
We came away from the workshop with a sense of overwhelming
necessity to inform both the Filipino and the broader American
communities of the true conditions of the Philippines today and
of their responsibility to help see that the Philippines, be truly
independent, free and prospe~ous.

SUMMARY FROM LABOR WORKSHOP Sacramento '79 - FWC
-Goal is to provide a basic framework for Filipinos in taking up
issues in the labor sector.
-To maintain continuity of experiences and lessons from year to year
in the Far Western Conference.
-Questions raised to facilitate discussion:
1. how do you organize Filipinos into unions
2. how do you deal with the difficulty of immigrant workers being
intimidated
3. how do you struggle to get the unions to actually represent
Filipinos and struggle against discrimination in the unions
4. where do Filipinos stand in relation to the U.S. working class
5. what will the impact on Pilipinos be of attacks in labor
I. Presentations from facilitators
A. farmworkers movement
-fannworkers not just Filipinos; it's the whole working
class' m t. "Immigrants' labor buil is country."
- ro lems in current UFW leadership
1. doesn't recognize the contribution of others prior to
1962--from Filipinos, Chinese
.2. problems on red-baiting which created artificial
divisions
3. defined one way of what is a union
-a way to organize people collectively to fight for
wages, better conditions, and rights
-a way to struggle against the contradiction between
profits and wages
-e.g., ised workers' wages from $1.33 in 1965
to over .00 n
-brought/problems in e u.s. labor leadership
out .
1. $500 billion in the u·. s ; · unions' pension funds
2. not being used to benefit workers, but rather to invest
to build more profits for big business
3. workers should work through their unions to change this,
~ use these monies for their interests
B.~
1. ~its .funct· .
-helps wQr rs to· self-organize
--informs wo~kers of :their rights
-media£es in unfair labor practices and takes the
eases to cOlJ.rt • · ·.
2. current attempts to -dilute ALRB (
--to 'make it easier for unions to dee
-regarding union security clauses_ __. _;.__.-•
C. seafood industry organizing ·
1. workers dealing with huge multi-national corporations,
U.S. and J-apan
2. work£or~ veJ;y di.~:a:asif:i.on ... about half immigrants
3. immigrants: problems with
-lack of understanding of basic rights
-about basis for their oppression and discrimination
-fear of black1isting from company and union
4. fighting back · ~·
-younger workers rebelled against working conditions,
discrimination; filed lawsuit against company
-got fired and blacklisted by union
-tried to form independent organization outside union;
but this group didn't have the clout the union has
-sued the union (ILWU) to get reinstated; they won and
struggled to change union by forming a rank-and-file
committee.

I
ART AND CULTURE WORKSHOP
SUMMATION
The Workshop opened with a review of last year's Art and Culture
workshop resolution, and a brief statement of the relationship
of our workshop to the overall Convention goals.
Nancy Rocamora and Christine Araneta gave a presentation on contemporary
Philippine arto Nancy dealt with the progressive
tradition of Philippine arto She pointed out that, while this is
not a dominant trend, this can be understood in the context of the
Filipino people's colonial education and culture. Christine discussed
the uses of culture under the New Society. Culture, she
explained, has been an ideal tool in the Marcos government's
effort to create a form of pseudo-nationalism, which fosters values
conducive to authoritarian rule and militarism. She concluded by
reporting on the commercialization of Philippine culture for the
sake of the tourist trade.
The discussion that followed centered on the various layers of influence
upon Philippine culture and their interaction with prehispanic
indigenous cultureo
Al Concepcion then presented a film produced by the Natl. Media
Production Center of the Philippines, entitled "I<asaysayan ng
Lahi". This film records a pageant and parade held upon the
occasion of the Miss Universe contest in 1974, which attempted
to depict the full sweep of Philippine history.
The discussion following the film dealt with the question of
authenticity, as a record of Philippine history and culture.
While workshop participants agreed that portions of the film
were authentic, particularly those dealing with pre-hispanic times,
numerous ques·tions were raised with regard to its depiction of
history from the 1898 Philippine Revolution ono The discussion
concluded on an urgent note that if this film represents what is
available for the Filipino community in the U.S. as a documentation
of Philippine history, that we in the workshop face a tremendous
challenge to produce valid and authentic records of Philippine
culture and history.
Pointing once more to our goals of creating art which is progressive
and community-based, the workshop then turned to a presentation
of the play "Vision of a Warbride". A slide show documenting
the research that went into the play was followed by Raymond
Camacho's discussion of the use of people's experiences as raw
materials for cultural presentations.
Sunday's discussion opened with a statement with the need for
constant interaction between community artists and audience in
propagating the concept of people's theater. With that note,
Ermena Vinluan, director of the Warbrides play, chaired a
critique session of the production. Participants generally affirm- I ed the accuracy and effectiveness of the play's content. A number
of constructive criticisms were raised with regard to various aspects
of the production, like acting, dance, costumes and make-up,
tech and musico These criticisms were noted by the company and
. ~ .. '., .

Art and Culture Summation
Page Two
will be incorporated in further performances in order to raise the standards
and quality of the play.
The workshop ended with a reiteration for continuity of this workshop
goals to next year's workshop, in order to better survey the growth of
cultural work within our communities. I

I Culture reflects a people's experiences and values and art is the
tool of cultural expression.
Furthermore, we of the art and culture workshop of the Filipino
Peoples Far West Convention of 1979 recognize that art should be used
consciously to serve the progressive aspirations of the Filipino Communities
and all peoples oppressed to conciously forge a cultural movement
based around these established principals and functions of art
as initially developed by the 1978 Art and Culture Workshop.
The Principals and Functions are:
A. Art is a vehicle for education and it should be used to:
1. Combat Systamatic miseducation
2. Teach progressive ideas
3. Represent our true historical experience
B. Art preserves our ethnic heritage by:
1. Instilling personal pride and dignity
2. Reinforcing a positive understanding of who we are as
individuals and as a people.
C • .Art is an entertaining vehicle that inspires our people to:
1. Unite
2. Actively participate in determining our personal and
collective destinies.
r. Therefore, be it resolved that the delegates of the Art and Culture
workshop of the 1979 Filipino People's Far West Convention implement
the following resolutions:
A. To return to our communities and develop local cultural groups
and develop a portfolio which documents their materials and
plans.
B. To launch an Art and Culture Task Force to implement the
following:
1. To update the directory in order to facilitate a community
network of community artists interested in sharing contacts
and resources who unite with the principals as indicated
above.
2. To plan for an Art Exhipit that unites with the above
principles to be shown at the 1980 PPFWCo
3. To provide for next years art and culture workshop with a
historical understanding of previous art and culture
workshops in order to link next years work with what was
accomplished this year and in the past.
The Task Force will comprise of the following delegates:
- -
Herb Tuyay, San Diego
Becki Saliwan, San Diego
Frances Araneta, Berekeley
Hy Gorre, Sacramento
Tim Fenkell, Sacramento
Ermena Vinluan, Oakland
Raymond Camacho, Oakland
Cindy Yeo, Los Angeles
Silme Domingo, Seattle
Stan Galvez, San Frncisco

PROPOSAL FOR THE FORMATION OF AN IMMIGRANT RIGHTS ORGANIZATION
Far West Convention -- 1979 Sacramento, Ca.
I. Given the historic relationship of immigrants to U.S.
labor needs, we can expect that with the worsening econmic
si tua.tion, immigrants will once again find thernsel ves
scap0goated for the ills of the economy. As was clearly
portrayed in the Immigrant Rights Workshop of the 1979
Far West Convention, this tendency is already reality
for many third wave Filipinos and a threat to all immigrants.
The recent wave of the harassment of third preference
immigrants, and elderly receiving SSI ·benefits,
and threats of deportation of H-1 nurses are only a few .
examples that attest to the vulnerability of this sector
of the Filipino community.
II. In the face of this~ the Filipino community should
not remain complacent. We have to be aware that the
level of response needed to decisively challenge the
Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) in its arbitrary
application of innnigrant laws, requires the involve-
·ment of Filipinos nation-wide. Only through a united
community can we re$pond with systematic, well-planned
and coordinated actions in defense of the democratic rights
of this unstable sector. Therefore, in the spirit of the
1979 FWC theme to "RISE TO THE CALL FOR ACTION", we of the
Immigrant Rights Workshop propose the formation of a Task
Force to begin laying the foundations for a national organization
f0r the defense of immigrant rights of Filipinos.
The main focus of the organization would be to target
those INS policies that have been assessed to be the most
harmful and far-reaching in its impact on the Filipino
community. Secondarily, the policies of the
government and other U.S.-related agencies will be ta~geted.
Also, we will link-up with other minority groups working
around immigrant rights.
III. Initially, the Task Force would act to facilitate
centralized communication for a national network of local
groups doing immigrant rights work. The Task Force would
be made up of representatives from local areas. It would
aapoint a national staff to carry out the day-to-day work
and a council of representatives from local areas to
guide the work of the national staff. The national staff
should consist of three or four individuals working from
a site designated as the national center. The key function
of the natioal staff would be to research INS policy and
follow-up with local areas so that some ki nd of accurate
synthesis of national trends might be derived. In this
way the national staff should be able to provide some
continuity and guidance to the work around immigrant
rights nationally. This should include putting out a
newsletter that summarizes and shares the lessons of the
local work, and dissemination of educational materials

,
to assist the local areas. Periodic meetings of the whole
Task Force (staff & council included) would be called to
sum up the local work, and national work, discuss strategies,
share information and make plans for joint national
campaigns. These periodic meetings would serve to better
guide the work of the national staff.
IV. After an appropriate length of time (possibly a year)
the Task Force should call for a national conference of
the various local groups in the immigrants rights network
to assess the year's work and formalize a national organization
based on a thorough summation of the current trends
and the lessons learned from the local areas.
V. The follow-up for the initial . meetings of the Task
Force should be delegated to the FWC steering committee
and the Immigrant Rights Workshop facilitators. It would
be their responsibility to disseminate information regarding
the formation of the Task Force and call for the first
organizing meeting. At this meeting such particularities
as building the national network, the functions of the !
national staff, council, funding possibilities, etc.
would be given closer attention.

,I
,I
PHILIPPIA:lES TODAY tiORYSHOP SU1ll'.L'\TIOU
In respecting the deinocratic rights of convention participants
who were not able to go through the same process of educational
discussions in our workshop, the Philippines Today workshop has
decided not to introduce any resolution for the convention body
to vote upon. This is also in recognition of the fact that as
distinct from other workshops, the Philippines Today inevitably
made judgments on the martial law.dictatorship. Thus, while we
believe most of the convention participants hold anti-martial law
sentiments, many of them may not be ready to vote on a resolution
because of anxiety over the possibility of retaliation. He
believe these anxieties should be respected for the good of the
whole convention.
The participants in our workshop reflected a diverse range
of ages, interests, and expectations. Young American l.>orn or· ~~
raised Filipinos came to find out what is happening in their
country of origin. Elders born and raised in the Philippines
came to be updated. Representatives of anti-martial law groups,
basetl both in tha Filipino and broader American communities came
to share their views and experiences in organizing opposition to
the regime. Although the Philippine Consulate formally informed
us of their inability to participate, •lr. aelicio Jacaban, former
publisher of Bataan News, represented the pro-martial law view
during Sunday's discussions.
The lively discussions were organized along the following
format~ economic conditions, present political situation, and
alternatives to the present regime. The main limitation of the
workshop was the limited time we had which restricted what
otherwise was a very spir_ited, and healthy exchange of views.
We realize that when you visit the Philippines, the existence
of martial law may not be immediately evident. The first things
you may notice may be the impressive hotels, art centers and
clean streets. But behind all this are some things that require
~ closer analysis.
'l!he 1ainority opinion in the workshop asserts that along with
the hotels, art centers, and clean streets there have been many
positive things about martial law. They argued that martial law
has promoted peace and order, encoura9ed oconomic rogress and
the development of commerco and natural resources, and instituted
land reform.

Page 2 (Philippi~es Today ••• )
However, an overwhelming majority of participants felt
strongly that, based on well-researched information, the following
points represent the true economic and political conditions in
the Philippines :
]. The ongoing armed resistance, both in Hindanao and in
the remainder of the country, defy the claims of the r-1arcos regime
that there is peace. In fact, this resistance is spreading and
increasing members of people are supporting the New People 9 s
Array .. Iloreover, the government itself perpetrates violence by
"salvaging", or systematically murdering suspected opponents of
the regime.
2. Economic conditions have become worse than ever under the
martial law regime. The. minority claims that the econo:nic iils
of the -o~ntry are consistent with a worldwide pattern of
inflation an<l economic instability1 but these ills do not come ..
naturally. They are directly linked with the fact that the Philippine
economy is controlled by foreign investors, predominantly
U .. S. corporations, whose profits are channelled back into the
U0 S. and do not stimulate Philippine business to the point of
self~reliance. I1arcos' policies have been generous to these
cor~orations because they keep him in power. So however true it
maybe that inflation (now up to 20% in the Philippines) is taking
place even in America, it follows that whatever adversely affects
the U.S. corporations will also adversely affect the Philippines.
3. The land reform prograu of the martial law gove~runent
is a farce. It is a program designed by wealthy landlords and
means very little to peasants and small farmers who cannot even
afford to buy the land that the government claims is available
to them .. On the other hand, those in power and huge foreign corporations
who supoort .1arcos are given all the land they want.
4. Aside from contributing vastly to the economic failures of
the Philippines, the regime continues to be a repressive one.
It continues to violate the human rights of volitical dissenters,
although it has tried to hide these repre-sive policies with the
cloak of "normalization°;. Furthermore, the people of the land
have no participation~in making laws since, under the )976 referendum
which many peol,Jle acknowledge to have been the res lt 9f
fraudulent public voting - f-iai:cos can veto even the Batasang
Pambansao With this kintl of power, and the active support of
the U.S. government, Harcos is very confid.Ant of remaining as dictator.
The recent U.S.-RP bases agreement , which grants ?!areas
$500 million in military aid, is an example of how much the U.S.
is willing to keep Ilarcos in power ..

Page 3 {PHilippines Today •.• )
Various alternatives were reviewed an<l discussed for their
merits. One alternative is constitutional democracy. This is
proposed by disenfranchised politicians who do not see the need
to change the whole social and economic system but only see the
need to repla~e Marcos and some of his policies. Another alter~··
native is social democracy, adopted by some former politicians,
Jesuit priests and some students who see the need for reforms
but are not willing to dismantle fully UoS. and foreign control
of the Philippine economy and the systen of landlordisM. The
other alternative is the national democratic program which is fast
gaining popularity among workers, peasants, students and
intellectunls, religious, professionals and even nationalistic
Pilipino capitalists. This alternative proposes to dismantle fully
landlordism by distributing lands to the landless, free the
Philippines from foreign economic domination by nationalizing
foreign investments and holdings and protecting native capital
and resources for the benefit of Filipinos. This alternative
proposes to raise the living standards of the majority while
promoting democratic freedoms of speech, religion, asse.rnbly
and ass0~j_ation under a coali.ti.nn government of all patriotic
forces who fought to overthrow the U. So backed r-1arcos dictatorship.
This alternative Bees that only national revolution can
topple a well-armed dictatorship but that this revolution has to
take place in a protracted process to ensure the participation
of the majority of the people. The workshop partici~ants generally
felt they would like to study and understand more about
this alternative. The workshop was also encouraged to support
the resistance movement Jack home by partic~~ating in or
supporting the activities of groups like the 1'.Jlti-!iartial Law
Coalition.
Furthermore, as a workshop, we adopted the following
resolution.
We, the members of the workshop on Philippine Conditions
Today of this year's Filipino Peoples Far Hest Convention
hereby resolve~
]. We condemn the martial law dictatorship of Harcos
in the Philippines and call for an end to martial law in the
Philippines.
2. He call for a restoration of civil liberties and human
rights in the Philip~ines, including restoration of freedom of
speech and the press.
3. · tJe call for the freeuom of all political prisoners in
the Philippines.
4. We call for an end of U.S. military and economic ai<l to
I-larcos in the Philippines, and call for an end to economic
exploitation of the Philippines by U.S. corporations.


Page 4 (Philippines Today ••• )
5. Be it resolved, that we support united efforts to end
martial law in the Philippines.
This position was adopted by a vote of 34 yes, zero no
and]] abstantions. On the whoae, the workshop members over~.
whelmingly felt that the workshop discussions were informative,
thought-provoking and fruitful in strengthening our bonds with
the homeland and heigthening our patriotic concern over the
plight and fate of the Philippines and the Filipino people.
We came away from the workshop with a sense of overwhelming
necessity to inform both the Filipino and the broader American
communities of the true conditions of the Philippines today and
of their responsibility to.help see that the Philippines, be truly
independent, free and prosperous.

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Date Added
December 3, 2021
Collection
Fenkell Family collection
Item Type
Text
Citation
Far West Convention, “1978 Convention- Minutes, Event Programs, Committee Rules, Correspondences (Fenkell Papers, Box 1, Folder 21),” Welga Archive - Bulosan Center for Filipino Studies, accessed January 20, 2022, https://welgadigitalarchive.omeka.net/items/show/761.